Lorenzo & his humble friends

The fool doth think he is wise, but the wise man knows himself to be a fool

Tag: Italian elections

Before we laugh at this rudderless state

Italy, for better or worse, has served as an amazing laboratory of political innovation in recent history. Fascism and the mafia were Italian inventions. And the Berlusconi phenomenon—the combining of media power, money, and celebrity, and translating it into political power—was, like it or not, an innovation that found imitators around the world. If Berlusconi represents the political potential of television, Grillo is one of the first political figures to build a major political movement largely through the Internet. And that Grillo, a not particularly funny comedian with a mop of unruly gray hair and a foul mouth, should create a political movement out of nothing and turn it into the largest party in the country in just a few years is not as strange as it might at first appear. Read the rest of the article on The New Yorker.

Change. But which one?

This is one of the clearest and most complete articles I have read so far on the outcome of the Italian elections. And this is another one.

Very well

My visit in the UK comes at a very good moment, when Italy’s reputation abroad is at one of its highest peaks.

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All my votes

Although I have commented on the possible outcome, I have not decided what I will vote in the upcoming elections: I am officially undecided. Meanwhile, borrowing an idea of Francesco Costa, I am drafting a list of how I voted in the past.

9-10 April 2006
Italian Political Elections
I voted for the centre-left coalition and for the candidate Prime Minister Romano Prodi, who defeats Silvio Berlusconi with a difference of 0.06% of the votes. Today I would give the same vote. Election won.

25-26 June 2006
Constitutional Referendum
Deciding whether or not to approve the constitutional reform promoted by the center-right government: I did not know much about the reform, but my vote was based on the fact that it had been approved by a majority that I did not like and that had been rejected by the voters. I voted No, and No won with 61%. Today I would probably give the same vote. Election won.

25-26 June 2006
Local Referendum
Deciding whether the province of Trento should continue to finance private schools: I am not necessarily against public finance even for private confessional schools, but the total amount provided with public money was outrageous. I voted Yes to the abolition of public finance for private schools, and 93% of the voters vote Yes, but the referendum fails as it does not reach the quorum: only 19% of the people vote. Today I would give the same vote. Election lost.

13-14 April 2008
Italian Political Elections
I voted for the Partito Democratico and for the candidate Prime Minister Walter Veltroni. His party takes 33%, but is part of the  loser coalition: Silvio Berlusconi is elected Prime Minister. Today I would give the same vote. Election lost.

09-10 September 2008
Local elections in the Province of Trento
I voted for the Partito Democratico and for the coalition that supports Lorenzo Dellai. The party takes 22% of the votes, and the coalition takes 57%, defeating the opposing candidate Sergio Divina. Today I would give the same vote. Election won.

3 May 2009
Local elections in the City of Trento
I was in Ireland for my exchange abroad and I could not vote. The Partito Democratico’s candidate Alessandro Andreatta won the elections with 64%.

6-7 June 2009
European elections
I was in Ireland for my exchange abroad and I could not vote. The Partito Democratico went well, although it is always hard to comment on European elections.

21-22 June 2009
Referendum
The vote was about future referendum rules and it proposed to make them easier. I voted Yes, but the quorum stopped at 23% and the referendum failed. Today I would give the same vote. Election lost.

12-13 June 2011
Referendum
Four questions: two on the management of water resources, one on nuclear energy and one on legitimate impediment. I voted Yes to the first question on the water and one on legitimate impediment, I voted No to the second question on the water and on the one on nuclear energy. Yes wins in all four questions and with more than 55% of the people going to vote, the quorum is (surprisingly) reached. Today I would give the same vote. Election half won and half lost.