Lorenzo & his humble friends

The fool doth think he is wise, but the wise man knows himself to be a fool

Tag: the new yorker

Weekend long reads, April 2021

Rachel Aviv, How Elizabeth Loftus Changed the Meaning of Memory, The New Yorker. James Parker, The relentless Philip Roth, The Atlantic.

Weekend long reads, February 2021

Joshua Rothman, What If You Could Do It All Over?, The New Yorker. Sam Anderson, The Last Two Northern White Rhinos on Earth, The New York Times Magazine. Tom Vanderbilt, The joys of being an absolute beginner – for life, The Guardian. Joshua Chaffin, How the far-right fell into line behind Donald Trump, The Financial Times. Leonardo Piccione, An angle no one else could have, Bidon. Annamaria Testa, L’arte di ascoltare, Internazionale.

Weekend long reads, November 2020

Andrew Sullivan, Trump is gone. Trumpism just arrived, Substack. Dana Goodyear, The iconoclast remaking Los Angeles’ most important museum, The New Yorker. Peter Hessler, Nine days in Wuhan, the Ground Zero of the pandemic, The New Yorker.

Weekend long reads, May 2020

Valerio Millefoglie, Ricordi di una vita in bottiglia, Il sole 24 ore. Bill Buford, Baking bread in Lyon, The New Yorker. Anthony Lane, The enduring pleasure of night ride, The New Yorker. Paul Theroux, Paul Theroux recalls a fear-filled lockdown, The New Yorker.

“In times of crisis we should all be diarists and documentarians. We’re bound to wail and complain, but it’s also useful to record the particularities of our plight … Still writing gives order to the day and helps inform history”.

 

Weekend long reads, April 2020

Bill Buford, Mastering the art of making a French omelette, The New Yorker. Roberto Beneduce, Storie virali: Le lezioni di una pandemia, Treccani. Charlotte Mendelson, The tonic of gardening in a quarantine, The New Yorker. Liborio Conca, Cosa ricordiamo di Roberto Baggio, Minima et Moralia, Alexander Maksik, My father’s voice from Paris, The New Yorker. Katy Waldman, Dear diary, the world is burning, The New Yorker.

Weekend long reads, Winter 2019

Prospero section, A new documentary explores the underrated art of movie sound, The Economist; Jess McHugh, How to eat alone (and like it), The New York Times; Arthur Krystal, Why can’t we tell the truth about ageing and rebuttal letters, The New Yorker; Isaac Chotiner, From Little Englander to Brexiteers, The New Yorker; Margaret Talbot, Is the Supreme Court in Elena Kagan’s hands?, The New Yorker; Silvia Schirinzi, Tendenza Melania, RivistaStudio.

 

Swiss Saturdays

The morning farmers’ market: cheese (Gruyer salé, Vacherin, Brebis), bread (baguette aux olives, tresse tessinoise), vegetables (that changes depending on the season).

The New Yorker at l’Aubier in Winter, at L’Univers in Spring.

Lunch at Le Cardinal.

Fip radio, Thomoose’s Spotify playlists, or KEXP Live sessions.

Pipe and scotch.

My blog.

A bloc notes.

Update: here is the fair comment I received from an anonymous reader: ‘I had to laugh a bit about the random intellectual drops you mention (scotch, pipe, reading the New Yorker, writing in your bloc-notes while staring out of the window – I see you). Let me know when the Philip Roth transformation is complete‘.

 

Weekend long reads, November 2019

Books and Arts section, An expedition reveals the perils of reading Dostoyevsky in Antarctica, The Economist. Christian Jarrett, Acting changes the brain: it’s how actors get lost in a role, Aeon. Dan Hancok, How to feed a protest movement: cooking with Extinction Rebellion, 1843. Dan Piepenbring, The Book of Prince, The New Yorker. Rebecca Mead, The Gay Genealogist, The New Yorker.

Soundtrack: Gradbrothers Live Session during the Into The Great Wide Open festival on the Dutch Island Vlieland, 2017.

To-do list

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via The New Yorker

This is the story of Chris

In June 2013, the New Yorker wrote a 14-page story on Chris Kyle, American sniper, war veteran, national hero, killer, and much more. This is, without any doubt, one of the best journalistic pieces I have ever read. As for all the best stories, there is no definite truth and each of us will remember a different bit of. Take the time you need, sit down, print it out and read it through.

Il Post ha recentemente replicato l’articolo in italiano. E’ una storia che va dritta allo stomaco. Leggetela.